Managing your computing ecosystem Pt. 3

Managing your computing ecosystem Pt. 3

Overview

The prospect of universal and interoperable management interfaces is closer to reality than ever. Not only is infrastructure converging, but so is the control and management plane. Last time, we discussed Redfish for managing hardware platforms. This time we will talk about Swordfish for managing storage.

Swordfishswordfish

The goal of Swordfish is to provide scalable storage management interfaces. The interfaces are designed to provide efficient, low footprint management for simple direct attached storage with the ability to scale up to provide easy to use management across cooperating enterprise class storage servers in a storage network.

The Swordfish Scalable Storage Management API specification defines extensions to the Redfish API. Thus a Swordfish service is at the same time a Redfish service. These extensions enable simple, scalable, and interoperable management of storage resources, ranging from direct attached to complex enterprise class storage servers. These extensions are collectively named Swordfish and are defined by the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) as open industry standards.

Swordfish extends Redfish in two principal areas. The first is the introduction of the management and configuration based on service levels. The other is the addition of management interfaces for higher level storage resources. The following sections provide more detail on each.

Service based management

Swordfish interfaces allow the client to get what they want without having to know how the implementation produces the results. As an example, a client might want storage protected so that no more than 5 seconds of data is lost in the event of some failure. Instead of specifying implementation details like mirroring, clones, snapshots, or journaling, the interface allows the client to request storage with a recovery point objective of 5 seconds.   The implementation then chooses how to accomplish this requirement.

The basic ideas are borrowed from ITIL (a set of practices for IT service management that focuses on aligning IT services with the needs of business) and are consistent with ISO/IEC 20000.

A Swordfish line of service describes a category of requirements. Each instance of a line of service describes a service requirement within that category. The management service will typically be configured with a small number of supported choices for each line of service. The service may allow an administrator to create new choices if it is able to implement and enforce that choice. To take an example from airlines, you have seating as one line of service with choices of first, business, and steerage. Another line of service could be meals, with choices like regular, vegetarian, and gluten free. Lines of service are meant to be independent from each other. So, in our airline example, we can mix any meal choice with any seating choice.

Swordfish provides three lines of service covering requirements for data storage, (protection, security, and storage), and two lines of service covering requirements for access to data storage, (connectivity and performance).   Swordfish leaves the specification of specific choices within each of these lines of service to management service implementations.

A Swordfish class of service resource describes a service level agreement (SLA). If an SLA is specified for a resource, the service implementation is responsible for assuring that level of service is provided. For that reason, the management service will typically advertise only a small number of SLAs. The service may allow an administrator to create new SLAs if it is able to implement and enforce that agreement.   The requirements of an SLA represented by a class of service resource are defined by a small set of line of service choices.

Swordfish storage

Swordfish starts with Redfish definitions and then extends them. Redfish specifies drive and memory resources from a hardware centric point of view.   Redfish also specifies volumes as block addressable storage composed from drives. Redfish volumes may be encrypted. Swordfish then extends volumes and adds filesystems, file shares, storage pools, storage groups, and a storage service.   (Object stores are intended to be added in the future.)

A storage service provides a focus for management and discovery of the storage resources of a system.  Two principal resources of the storage service are storage pools and storage groups.

A storage pool is a container of data storage capable of providing capacity that conforms to a specified class of service. A storage pool does not support IO to its data storage.  The storage pool acts as a factory to provide storage resources (volumes, file systems, and other storage pools) that have a specified class of service. The capacity of a storage pool may come from multiple sources and are not all required to be of the same type. The storage pool tracks allocated capacity and may provide alerts when space is low.

A storage group is an administrative collection of storage resources (volumes or file shares) that are managed as a group. Typically, the storage group would be associated with one or more client applications. The storage group can be used to specify that all of its resources share the characteristics of a specified class of service. For example a class of service specifying data protection requirements might be applied to all of the resources in the storage group.

One primary purpose of a storage group is to support exposing or hiding all of the volumes associated with a particular application. When exposed, all clients can access the storage in the group via the specified server and client endpoints. The storage group also supports storage (or crash) consistency across the resources in the storage group.

Swordfish extends volumes and adds support for file systems and file shares, including support for both local and remote replication. Each type supports provisioning and monitoring by class of service. The resulting SLA based interface is a significant improvement for clients over the current practice where the client must know the individual configuration requirements of each product in the client’s ecosystem. Each storage service lists the filesystems, endpoints, storage pools, storage groups, drives and volumes that are managed by the storage service.

Recommendations

These three specifications should form the basis for any Restful system management solution.

As a starting point, OData provides a uniform interface suitable for any data service. It is agnostic to the functions of the service, but it supports inspection of an entity data model via an OData conformant metadata document provided by the service. Because of the generic functionality of the Restful style and with the help of inspection of the metadata document, any OData client can have both syntactic and semantic access to most of the functionality of an OData service implementation. OData is recommended as the basis for any Restful service.

Redfish defines an OData data service that provides a number of basic utility functions as well as hardware discovery and basic system management functions. A Redfish implementation can be very light-weight.   All computing systems should implement a Redfish management service. This recommendation runs the gamut from very simple devices in the IOT space up to enterprise class systems.

Finally, Swordfish extends the Redfish service to provide service based storage management. A Swordfish management service is recommended for all systems that provide advanced storage services, whether host based or network based.

Universal, interoperable management based on well-defined, supported standards. It may still seem like an impossible hope to some. Every day, however, we move closer to a more standard, more manageable infrastructure environment.

~George Ericson @GEricson

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